House Plants

Posted: March 13, 2021 in Chat
Tags: , , ,

What is you lock-down passion/vice/activity that keeps you sane?
We bought-in beaucoup des plantes de maison. It was around Christmas time (ok, a little before, but who’s counting?)
And so we live in a jungle, now. Well, no. But we bought:

Norfolk Pine

Araucaria heterophylla

Currently 10 weeks old.
Their place of origin – sole place of origin, now – we are informed, is a tiny island between New Zealand and Fiji: Norfolk Island. We were also informed that it is a species that predate the dinosaurs. Whatever you say.

I actually looked up Norfolk Island, and, yes, Google Maps have photos. I found them a little dismaying. How populated the place is now, with roads, even a cathedral, and all those people!

We were also informed this little fellas can grow up to 200 foot, in their normal outdoor, southern-hemisphere climates. Continually misted by sea spray – they never like the sea-bit of that, but do need daily misting…
with tepid, filtered, water.

That’s when you begin to wonder what you’ve taken on.

Among our goody-bag of house plants we also bought some Areca Palms:

Not a particularly good snap shot, but… you get the ‘picture’. Oo.

Prayer Plant

Now this is an odd one – lovely plant. At night its leaves all cluster together, almost palm to palm, as in prayer.
Except for the very top leaf.
The very top leaf: as we turn around each night – the plant stands to our backs, near the window – has always turned around 180 degrees, and is facing us! Keeping an eye on, taking notes, ‘observing our species at work and play, for use later.’

But most probably because nightly we face a source of light, the TV.

One of our favourite buys were several successive collections of Hyacinth bulbs. The blue variety scented the room every evening. And it was glorious to come down in the morning to their perfume.

Our other buys were a Yucca, many Parlour Palms, an Aloe Vera, and several other mysterious ones I have not come across before.
Quite a few of these need moist environments, and we have taken great trouble to banish moist from our rooms. So they now dry out quickly; no big deal, just a bit more watering.
Many of these plants were common in Victorian homes – even Queen Victoria was particularly fond of Parlour Palms. This is some indication of just how continually damp their houses – even palaces – must have been. And the chill that’d go with the damp. Hence the need for big roaring fires.

The coal fires I remember from childhood – forget all the cleaning of grates, of spilling ash, and the continual ash-scatter over everything – was how they warmed to too hot our fire-facing parts, while our backs kept almost cold.
Ah, but the smogs, fogs, the bronchitis, childhood asthma, and chest problems.

Comments
  1. etinkerbell says:

    I do love gardening myself , in particular flowers and aromatic plants. But if you ask me about lockdown vice/ activity, well, I am ashamed to say, but it is Candy Crush. 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s